Women’s football against women’s football | Sports | The USA Print

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So many years of hot flashes for takeoff and now everything is turbulence. The Titanic orchestra can already be heard in the background without having barely started the journey. It is the future of the scourged Spanish women’s football, which four days ago was a footballing Siberia and now it is eaten away from its first professionalism. A conquest of time despite the infinite obstacles. Óbices for both borreguil machismo, for the war between the League and the Federation, with fights over the calendar, television rights, arbitration salaries… Another shot in the foot was missing, the most serious: a revolt of 15 international players against the coach , Jorge Vilda, and, by extension, against the federative president, Luis Rubiales. And all with stenographers and without qualms. Not even macho soccer, where peacocks abound and vanities overflow, came to be so publicly exposed. Of course there have been certainties and suspicions of the soccer players’ leadership over the coaches. For example, and well-known, when Johan Cruyff managed to get Agustín Montal, president of Barça back in 1976, to strike down Hennes Weisweiler. “Either him or me”, the Dutchman came to say to the Barça rector. The German resisted two months. A bad roll in private resolved in favor of who usually emerges victorious: the footballer.

In the rancor of the feminine, so vociferated by both parties, it is a fencing pulse that no one can win. The conflict has been carried to such a point that there will be gorings for everyone. In the incipient rise of the women’s football division, altitude sickness has led to a confusion of powers. The leaders command, the coach trains and the soccer players play. But all estates are bound to the largest possible council. Today everyone is accused of not having been able to harmonize a round table. The players have taken center stage and loudly maintain that the coach Vilda is extemporaneous. They point to him as a brake because, they say, his old-fashioned methods prevent them from progressing. The coach, in turn sports director himself, follows his own and in his environment they allude to the indisputable successes of the lower categories. But the soccer players, in a kind of generational emancipation, want to fly higher. They champion a counter-reform because in less than a year they will face an entire World Cup in Australia and New Zealand. Barcelona’s European successes seem to have taken root in such a way that with Spain most feel lowered in their expectations.

The players are not foot soldiers. They must be listened to with the utmost attention, of course. And the technician, who should not be a puppet, should take note and reflect. Ultimately, the president, who is not for bagpipes, has to hear, see, feel and sentence if the general failure prevents harmony. To make matters worse, the challenge underlies a detail that is not in vain. Not a single Real Madrid player has signed the order. The Rubiales-Florentino bond prevails, with the enemy Javier Tebas as a link.

At the moment, Rubiales escorts Vilda, Vilda supports Vilda and the rebellious soccer players claim to assume the toll, cloud a World Cup horizon. In short, a collective expiration. In a year, Rubiales and Vilda will not be able to rebuild a team with guarantees for the great challenge of Oceania, no matter how much there is push in the lower categories. The internationals will pass up an extraordinary opportunity at the best moment of almost everyone’s career. If Spain falls by the wayside, both parties will have an alibi and will add more gasoline. For example, from the fence of the players the million dollar question already slips: Would the Federation have reacted the same to a male team?

The stakes had to be resolved in a closed and tolerant room with each one their role. Today, everyone is marked for evil. Just when a consortium was required. Just when, finally, the woman was no longer just splashing around in football. With the egometers shot, women’s football against women’s football.

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