Are you sure you have nothing to hide? Be careful, others do not think the same as you and take advantage of it | TV | The USA Print

0


Surely you are very comfortable storing as many photos as you have in a remote repository, downloading hundreds of mobile applications or having an email account with almost unlimited space. And surely you have not had to pay a single euro for it. If you understand the market economy, you may have wondered how it is possible for the world’s highest-earning companies to make a profit if they give away their products to their customers. Perhaps it is that you have not yet understood that you are not their client and that what they sell is to you. Not only do they sell that data, photos or content, but they also sell what they think of you, what they think you really are, beyond what you think you are, your secrets and, most seriously, your future. Companies buy data from them to make decisions about you, specifically.

All that data that they collect from all of us (billions every minute) make up huge databases that they use for their own interests or to resell to third parties. Then, complicated algorithms are in charge of monetizing economically by offering us personalized advertising or selling your profile.

Let’s see how, through their own advertising, each actor tries to value their positions regarding data processing and protection.

This announcement of The English Courtalthough it is still a humorous parody, it is very significant of what many people think about the privacy of our communications and the use that is made of them.

Safe Internet Banking, a website specializing in online security and finance, was one of the first to raise the alarm about the use that could be made of the personal data that we are scattering on the different websites we browse. This promotion, shot about 10 years ago, in which the famous Belgian mentalist Dave pretends to guess very personal information about anonymous people just by hugging them. In the end it is discovered that people’s private lives are more visible than we think.

“Nothing is private” is the title of the documentary I made Netflix where he brings out the dirty laundry of the big technology companies, and especially the scandal of Cambridge Analytica and Facebook, in which with the collection of data and its processing it managed to influence major world affairs such as the Brexit campaign of UK or US 2016 election campaign which Trump won.

Interestingly, Mark Zuckerberg’s company is now trying to establish itself as a champion of privacy by guiding its users to adjust their preferences in the best way to their needs.

Another application of Mark that is so little “suspicious” of snooping in our daily chores is WhatsApp (sic). He assures that he cares that our secrets are safe and presumes that all his communications are encrypted point to point (from sender to receiver) so that no one can poke their nose into our messages.

One of the most active and vigilant companies on the subject of privacy is Manzana. The apple brand incorporates elements in its devices that make it more difficult to obtain data from the owner, either with or without their consent. And that advertises it. One of the latest advertisements that has been launched simulates a public auction where what is being bid for is the private life of an Apple user. Logically, the story ends with a happy ending.

More from Apple. Everything you do throughout the day is picked up by one of the many applications that you have installed on your mobile device or tablet. With machines running the bitten apple operating system it’s up to you to allow it or not.

rain is a Spanish initiative that also tries to preserve the privacy of its users by putting them under cover if the cloud starts to rain. Currently, the project is on hiatus due to the electronic components crisis in Asia.

In another order of things, children are the perfect target as well as a future pool of clients for companies that are dedicated to the “dark” data trade. Knowing what others can or cannot do with their affiliation is essential to prevent difficult situations in the future. Unicef has simulated a press conference between kids from a school so that they become aware of the extent to which their lives are exposed on the internet and the dangers that it entails.

Although at first not everyone agreed with preserving privacy on the network. In 2017, a lobby group launched the campaign #likeabadmovie, in which he denounced that all the European laws that were going to regulate privacy from that moment on would cause confusion in users and problems of all kinds. There was no further news of this move.

But our privacy is not only nourished by our personal data, nor is it exposed only within the set of cables that make up the internet. Real life is also full of snoopers trying to see what they shouldn’t in order to take advantage of it or simply to gossip. Two ads of useful objects for everyday life. The first is from the American multinational 3M. It is a screen saver for the computer that avoids those mischievous looks over the shoulder that we have sometimes felt when we are at the keyboard at work, in a cafeteria…

Finally, and with the seal of the Swedish furniture firm Ikea, one of the usual screens placed in context for the new realities. The motto is illuminating when it comes to private life: “Finally, the internet is catching up with real life.”

So the next time you say you have nothing to hide, think hard.

You can follow EL PAÍS TELEVISION on Twitter or sign up here to receive our weekly newsletter.



LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here